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The Accuracy of Medication Administration Data in the Emergency Department: Why Does It Matter?

      In the past decade, emergency departments, like most clinical settings, have seen an explosion in electronic health records (EHRs),
      • Adler-Milstein J
      • Jha AK
      HITECH act drove large gains in hospital electronic health record adoption.
      which has fueled growth in the use of EHR data for research and operational analysis. In this issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing, de Hond et al
      • de Hond T
      • Keuning B
      • Oosterheert JJ
      • Blom-Ham W
      • Schoonhoven L
      • Kaasjager K
      Differences in documented and actual medication administration time in the emergency department: a prospective, observational, time-motion study.
      publish the results of their study investigating the outcomes of the timely administration of medications in the emergency department. One of their findings is that actual medication times differ from those recorded in the EHR.
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      Biography

      Kenrick Cato, School of Nursing, Columbia University, New York, NY. ORCID identifier: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0704-3826

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