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Use of Intranasal Ketamine for the Severely Agitated or Violent ED Patient

Published:November 04, 2015DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jen.2015.09.017
      Current standard of care of the violent or severely agitated ED patient requires assistance from numerous hospital personnel, including security, doctors, nurses, and other health care providers to protect patients and others from the patient’s self-destructive and dangerous behavior. Some agitated, violent ED patients do not respond to traditional alternative de-escalation techniques, and thus use of chemical or physical restraints may be required if they pose an immediate risk of harming themselves or others.
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      Biography

      Patricia A. Normandin, Member, Massachusetts ENA, Beacon Chapter,is ED Staff RN, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA.

      Biography

      Stacia J. Khorey is ED Staff Nurse, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA.

      Biography

      Margaret A. Donahue, Member is ED Staff Nurse, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA.

      Biography

      Stacey A. Benotti is Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Pediatric and Adult Emergency Department, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA.

      Biography

      Barbara A. Manning is ED Staff RN, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA.

      Linked Article

      • Use of Intranasal Ketamine for the Severely Agitated or Violent ED Patient
        Journal of Emergency NursingVol. 42Issue 3
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          In reference to the article “Use of Intranasal Ketamine for the Severely Agitated or Violent ED Patient,” 1 I would like to commend these authors for their attention to this important issue in emergency departments. Safety of all hospital staff involved in the care of these patients is a major ongoing issue in health care today. The facility I work for has an overwhelming number of these types of patients because it has one of the only psychiatric emergency departments in the area. Many severely agitated or violent patients are brought in by police and are in need of immediate intervention.
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