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System Factors and Patient Falls in Emergency Departments

Published:February 17, 2009DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jen.2008.10.013
      As recommended by Terrell et al,

      Terrell KM, Weaver CS, Giles BK, Ross MJ. ED patient falls and resulting injuries. J Emerg Nurs 2009;35:89-92.

      emergency department–specific fall risk models need to be developed to account for key differences that relate to emergency departments. However, it is necessary to recognize that beyond the primary patient-related factors, there are a number of inherently unique system-related factors that exert a diffuse but equally significant influence on the overall fall risk profile in this environment.
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      Reference

      1. Terrell KM, Weaver CS, Giles BK, Ross MJ. ED patient falls and resulting injuries. J Emerg Nurs 2009;35:89-92.

      Linked Article

      • ED Patient Falls and Resulting Injuries
        Journal of Emergency NursingVol. 35Issue 2
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          Patient falls are the most common adverse events reported in hospitals. There is a growing body of literature on inpatient falls but a lack of data on ED falls. We applied the Hendrich II Fall Risk Model to patients who fell during their ED stays and provided a description of the patients and their injuries.
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